Hoodie history

zip hoodie girlHoodie – also called hooded sweatshirt or hoody.
Most of hoodies have a muff sewn onto a lower front panel and a hood for head protection. The hood often has a drawstring for adjusting the hood opening. Some hoodies has a vertical zipper down the center like most of jackets.


The garment’s style and form can be traced back to Medieval Europe when the normal clothing for monks included a long, decorative hood called a cowl attached to a tunic or robes, and a chaperon or hooded cape was very commonly worn by any outdoors worker. The hooded sweatshirt was first produced in the United States by Champion starting in the 1930s and marketed to laborers who endured freezing temperatures while working in upstate New York. The term hoodie entered popular usage in the 1990s.

Public_Enemy_4The hoodie took off in the 1970s, with several factors contributing to its success. Hip hop culture developed in New York City around this time, and the hoodie’s element of instant anonymity, provided by the accessible hood, appealed to those with criminal intent. High fashion also contributed during this era, as Norma Kamali and other high-profile designers embraced and glamorized the new clothing. Most critical to the hoodie’s popularity during this time was its iconic appearance in the blockbuster Rocky film.

Tommy_shifftyBy the 1990s, the hoodie had evolved into a symbol of isolation, a statement of academic spirit, and several fashion collections. The association with chavs or neds in the UK developed around this time, as their popularity rose with that specific demographic. Young men, often skateboarders or surfers, sported the hoodie and spread the trend across the western United States, most significantly in California. The rise of hoodies with university logos began around this time. Tommy Hilfiger, Giorgio Armani, and Ralph Lauren, for example, used the hoodie as the primary component for many of their collections in the 1990s. A crystal-studded hoodie made by rapper Sean “Diddy” Combs was acquired by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.